Keep your motivation alive – Part 1: Gold medals

“Writing a book is no sprint: you need to maintain your enthusiasm and belief over the long haul.”

Writing a book is no sprint: you need to maintain your enthusiasm and belief over the long haul.

Deciding to Write Your Book (worthy of Pooh Bear capitals) is thrilling.  You add your big new project to your list, mind buzzing, eyes full of book covers, ears full of “author of…”, alive with ideas.  It sparkles.

So how do you hold onto that energy and motivation in the steady marathon ahead?  Writing a book is no sprint: you need to maintain your enthusiasm and belief over the long haul.  So here’s how.  These four posts will look at keeping it alive, extending the marathon metaphor to its limits:

  1. The gold medal
  2. Measuring the miles
  3. The open road
  4. Water tables and cheering spectators

The gold medal

Eyes on the prize: what’s this book worth to you?  What will it bring you, your clients, your business?  Well, for a start…
  • raise your status: It positions you as an expert – it says you know your stuff, and the great content shows that your know your stuff
  • earn you passive income: Whether it’s a full-length book or a series of e-books, it brings you income. You’re not just exchanging your time for money endlessly – you put the time in now and then it keeps on paying you back
  • advertise for you: Your book has a life of its own, moseying around the world from person to person. Often we’ll recommend a book more easily than we will a person – and once someone reads the book, they’ll see your worth.  Organising publicity for and around a book also opens new doors.
  • reach people you never will: Not everyone can make it to your face-to-face seminars, workshops, and keynotes.  Not everyone goes to workshops and coaching sessions.  And not everyone can afford you.  But through your book, you can still reach them.
  • teach you more than you teach: This is the alchemical magic.  You don’t know how much you know.  Taking your knowledge, shuffling it and organising it, combing through your experience for examples and case studies, will teach you far more than you’ll teach anyone else.  (That process also, very often, generates new products and workshops as you realise what you know.)

That’s a splendid list of benefits.  Now, make it yours.  Cut and paste the list (ctrl-C, ctrl-V) into a new document and customise each point for your business, your clients, and you.  Get specific with people and numbers.  Get personal with I, me, we, our.  Add your own thoughts to the list.  Change it to your favourite font.  Put it in colour.  Print it out.  Stick it on your pinboard, the fridge, the bathroom wall.  Go on, then – off you go…

NEXT: MEASURING THE MILES


Flickr images: Marathon runner by WillyG; Gold medal by cliff1066

5 thoughts on “Keep your motivation alive – Part 1: Gold medals

  1. Pingback: Keep your motivation alive – Part 4: Water tables and cheering spectators | Thought Leader Books: The Blog

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